Spare Time & Holidays.By Maia and Morgan

In class we have been reading the play of ‘Oliver Twist’. Since ‘Oliver Twist’ was set in the Victorian times we are going to talk about what people did in their spare time and holidays during this period.

 Spare time-Richer families

 In the Victorian era many people did not have a lot of spare time unlike today but richer children were more likely to play inside.

In the Nursery

Small Children had the most expensive and well made toys. The most popular toy was the wooden rocking horse (always very colourful).

 Toys for the older age

Older children would collect parts of a theatre and over time would have a miniature theatre; they would put on little shows or plays.

 Spare time-Poorer families

Poorer Children had a lot less spare time than richer children and were more likely to play outside.

All poor children played outside no matter what age. They would play with marbles, hoops and balls (which we still play with today).They also played in streets or fields in big groups.

Boys playing marbles by George Eastman House. Public Domain image.

 Holidays

Unlike today, in the Victorian era there wasn’t that many holidays.

In the early Victorian era were just getting introduced .

When Christmas and Easter time came the holidays that they had were very important especially to Christians and poorer families. Poorer families often went to the seaside as it was cheap and easy to get to (if you lived by the sea).The most popular seaside destinations were Blackpool and Southend. In the Victorian era most people went to the beach fully clothed.

 As you can see lots of things have changed since the Victorian era but some things still stay the same.

I hope you have enjoyed reading about spare time and holidays during the Victorian times.

Morgan and Maia X

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Spare Time & Holidays.By Maia and Morgan

  1. olhspupil Post author

    Like the blog don’t really like the colours though, but the rest of the blog is fantastic 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s