Asylum Seekers by Chloe, Eve and Stephen

We chose “asylum seekers” as our blog topic because we thought it went well with the novel, “Divided City” by Theresa Breslin. This is what we have been studying in English. We went with this topic because of Kyoul fleeing from his own country and about his amazing  story coming to Glasgow. He came from the Balkans because his country was at war and he was getting threatened to be killed.  

An asylum seeker is someone who has left their country and applied for asylum in another country, but some applications can be rejected. Asylum seekers come to different countries to escape from conflicts in their own country, they also go to different places to look for safety.

Syrian refugee by Bengin Ahmad [Licence: CC BY-ND 2.0]

Syrian refugee by Bengin Ahmad [Licence: CC BY-ND 2.0]

Asylum seekers don’t come to the UK  to claim benefits because some of them don’t know what benefits are. They are not allowed to work so they are forced to have state support. They are expected to live on £5 a day to buy food and buy clothes for their children or themselves. Immigration officers have the power to jail asylum seekers even if they have not done anything wrong. 

In the UK, there is between £200,000 and £250,000 being spent on training new doctors when some asylum seekers are trained doctors but cannot work here. We need these doctors to help people who are coming here with injuries from their journey. They are coming here to get away from conflict in their country. There is lots of violence and war so they flee to somewhere safe. Many people jump on the back of lorries because they or their families have been threatened to be killed. They need to pay lots and lots of money to get on the lorry or a bus. 

In the UK there were 19,801 asylum applications in 2011. This is the second lowest level in 10 years. 490,000 refugees have fled the conflict in Democratic Republic of Congo, including about 15,000 in 2011. A lot of people are granted to stay in this country.

When we started the topic, we didn’t know a lot about an asylum seeker’s life but we have learned a lot, such as how they get to the country, why they come here and how long the process is to have permission to stay. We found the topic very interesting and we think that Scotland could help them by making the process shorter.

Bibliography

Scottish Refugee Council – http://www.scottishrefugeecouncil.org.uk/ accessed 19/11/2015

Daily Record – http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/ accessed 19/11/2015

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